Geek Girl by Holly Smale

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My first thoughts after finishing Geek Girl…I had none. I had no idea what to expect going into this book and with not having read anything by Holly Smale I had no expectation on what it should be like and couldn’t build it up, no clear thoughts about it, all I knew was that I loved it, that I had read it sooner, and that it ended too soon for my liking.

Geek Girl was a quick read, not because it only had a few pages, 378 pages to be exact, but because I devoured it. I have never read a book so fast before, and not just because I wanted to get to my next book, but because I was so hooked. I could not put it down. It’s the story of 15-year-old Harriet Manners who goes from milquetoast to model in 60 seconds. You see, Harriet is a certified geek. She knows this because she looked it up in the Oxford English Dictionary sitting on her bedside table. Harriet has one friend, the one who has a dream to be a fashion model since she was a child, Nat and a boy who’s Harriet certified stalker aka geekier than her, Toby, and everybody hates her, yes! You read it right… everybody… But I couldn’t possibly understand why Harriet’s sparkling personality shines through from the very first page – and I was hooked.

She is the perfect example of a Geek Girl, but being so perfect means she gets taunted a lot, and I did feel sorry for what she deals with. I liked her best friend Nat, and while I don’t agree with what transpires when she finds out about Harriet’s modelling, I did cheer for how she stands up for Harriet against a bully.

This novel shows the reader that people with intelligence, someone who is very knowledgeable and enthusiastic or obsessive about a specific subject especially when they are teenagers, can sometimes fall subject to bullying, as Harriet discovers when archnemesis Alexa Roberts cruelly humiliates her in class. That is why she have decided to go to Russia to pursue a career in modelling the answer to all of popularity-challenged Harriet’s problems.

I don’t want to say too much about the plot as you need to experience it yourself. There are lots of characters that stand out for me, Wilbur, Nick, the Dad and Annabel and of course Harriet. They make the story unique in its own way and I looked forward to reading what they would do or say next.
Holly Smale has done a great job at drawing the reader in and not letting them go and I for one will be keeping my eye open for future books by Holly Smale. Geek Girl is extremely exaggerated, dramatic, and extreme -although not entirely unrealistic as it is partly based on the author’s own childhood, but I wouldn’t have had it any other way. It’s home to a host of articulate, well-constructed characters and is sure to delight geeks and nerd- fighters alike.

You would never have guessed that Geek Girl is Holly Smale’s debut novel, honestly. Smale’s writing is so smooth and compelling. The story and characters were fresh, and exciting and I really can’t wait for you guys to read it and love it like I did.

“You need to stop caring what people who don’t matter think of you. Be who you are and let everybody else be who they are. Differences are a good thing.”

4 out of 5 stars

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Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami

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I was intrigued, and was hooked as soon as I started reading. To tell the truth, I’m new to Murakami’s work and new to Japanese literature in general. Haruki Murakami has a clear, lucid, sharp style of writing and definitely knows how to turn story plots into page turners which get completed before you know it, and leave you with thoughts long after you have finished. The story kicks off with thirty-seven-year-old Toru Watanabe hearing his old girlfriend’s favourite Beatles song and finding himself drawn inexorably back to the summer of eighteen years ago – the summer of his first year at university, the year he learnt what it means to love someone who is irrevocably broken. It is this year that he begins to have feelings for Naoko, the girlfriend of his best friend Kizuki, who left a hole in both Toru and Naoko’s lives when he committed suicide two years previously. Through the pages of this book, Haruki Murakami has explored loss, pain, sexuality, growing up, love and related topics and addresses some difficult coming-of-age questions. The theme is overwhelmingly elegiac, and raises a few disturbing questions regarding death / suicides and the (spiritually empty) materialism filled life of today. He conveys the idea that death is not really the end of life, but an intrinsic part of it, and that life and death are not really opposites in that sense, but two sides of the same coin. The characters have been handled with great sensitivity and have been developed well, and they sort of grow on you as the novel progresses. There is quite a bit of sexuality in this novel, as demanded by the story line. Norwegian Wood also gives the reader a peek into Japanese culture. In Murakami’s own words, this novel is one of his few “realistic” works, with “realistic” characters and that is probably why it is so popular.
if you like pacy, action-packed books, this one probably isn’t for you. The plot meanders along lazily, and though it’s a story full of heightened emotions, it’s also the story of an every man living a brightly-peopled but ordinary life. But if you enjoy richly layered stories about loss of innocence and the complexity of human relationships, this is an absolute must-read

“Nobody likes being alone that much. I don’t go out of my way to make friends, that’s all. It just leads to disappointment. ” 

5 out of 5 stars

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

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This novel will stay with me for a while… sigh.

Me Before You, by Jojo Moyes, haunts me because it’s how I feel about this book. This book introduced me to Will Traynor, a man who was a president of a Company, a thrill-seeker and a ladies man who loved his life. Then he was cut down in his prime by a tragic accident that caused him to live as a quadriplegic, his days are filled with therapy, prescriptions, catheter changes and a humiliating dependence on others for everything. He lives under an oppressive cloak of depression, fear and pain. Here comes Louisa who is a working-class girl, her family depend on her meager wage from a local cafe where she worked for 6 years – to her shock she lose her job. Louisa knows that her family need her to earn and desperately starts looking for another job. After a few false starts, she reluctantly accepts a position as a carer to a young man who is paralyzed. Will Traynor’s mother hire Louisa to be his companion and a caregiver during the day. It doesn’t take long to Louisa to figure out the true reason for her position. However, once the family sees their connection, Louisa asked the help of Will Traynor’s family to convince him to live.

Told mainly from Louisa’s view point, the novel appears more balance when Jojo Moyes throws in a chapter from Will’s mothers’ perspective or that of Louisa’s sister that the novel becomes fragmented. We, people have that moment in life when something occurs that forever changes everything, an event that literally makes the world stop because nothing will ever be the same. Will’s moment was obviously his accident, but Louisa had one too, causing her to pick the safest path in life. Louisa’s contentment with her small life frustrates Will. He is a prisoner of his own body and she is a prisoner of her own fear. The twist in the story is that as Louisa attempts to convince Will that his life is not over, that he can still do things, that he can have a new life. That’s the point Louisa started to realize this may be true for her as well.

The story really came alive when it was just Will and Louisa. The dialogue between Will and Louisa is priceless, they stimulate one another. The irony is that, if not for a wheelchair, their lives would never have intersected.

The truth is, there comes a time while reading the book I am still hoping that miracles might happen that Will might get up and walk off into the sunset with Louisa. But quadriplegic is a quadriplegic, it’s like I am praying that a black crow will turn into a white crow. Jojo Moyes is an amazing storyteller, able to capture my attention right away at the first three chapters. She never ignored the facts that her hero was in a wheelchair and took the time to make sure that readers really understood what his daily existence was like. She successfully communicated his angers, fears and regrets. As a reader, I felt Louisa’s desperation to make Will’s life better; I desperately wanted to make it better too. The ending was not what I would have chosen. But I think Jojo Moyes wrote a realistic story that will leave its readers with bittersweet feelings, if somewhat of a broken heart. It is a very powerful and emotional novel, full of insight into people’s lives. We will think that it is a perfect read-uplifting, but also a tragic.

“You only get one life, It’s actually your duty to live it as fully as possible.”

5 out of 5 stars (two thumbs up)

Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

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Tabitha Suzuma’s Forbidden is probably the most intensely powerful novel that I’ve read in a seriously long time and I really don’t know where to start with this review.
The truth is I really can’t get over with this one.. with Lochan and Maya. I did not expect that this book will have this effect on me. I have read the reviews on goodreads that is why curiosity hit me, I really wanted to enter the lives of Lochan and Maya. And this is my first time to read this kind of young adult novel, what do I mean about this. Well, this book is about a brother and a sister in love with each other. But, that’s just a concept, an idea. What can get really uncomfortable is the details that the author put in the intimate scenes. I know…I know, you’re probably thinking that Incest is disgusting and disturbing. Consensual incest is one of the most controversial subjects out there, and to be honest, I was extremely curious as to how the author would handle it. But, quite frankly, it blew me away. Lochan and Maya’s story is delivered beautifully, but in an artful, unflinching way that really captured my attention. All at once I was cheering Maya and Lochan on and feeling a little uncomfortable. The conflict between my heart and mind kept me on the edge of my seat for the entire novel. All of the questions that would be asked about Lochan and Maya’s relationship, they asked themselves. And couldn’t answer them any more than an outsider could. But their situation is so different and something unusual was bound to stem from it. A closeness in age, running their household, being parents to their three younger siblings and having to work together made them much closer than a normal brother and sister would be. From this partnership stemmed a passionate, but tender, love that’s both so wrong and so right. I don’t know but at times, conventional wisdom tells me that this relationship is wrong. But the love between Lochan and Maya is so undeniable, I really want them to find a way to make things work out. It is incredibly moving and I found myself dreading the inevitable.
This is a heartbreaking, raw story that will take you on an emotional rollercoaster. Maya and Lochie’s anguish and pain jump out of the page and you feel their emotions every step of the way. By the end of the book, I was shocked and so shaken, not only by the outcome of the story but by all the strong emotions that each of the characters inspired in me. Forbidden is a book that will stay with me for a long time. Tabitha Suzuma is a genius writer, as an avid reader I come across dozens and dozens of books hoping the next one I pick up will either move me to uncontrollable tears, challenge my belief system, take me on an emotional rollercoaster, show me love, make me feel hate, sigh with happiness, leave me with a sense of longing, or simply just close the book when I’m done and say to yourseslf “wow, that was absolute perfection.” This book didn’t just do one of those, it did all of the above and then some. Thanks to you Tabitha Suzuma.
Forbidden is absolutely consuming, heart breaking, and an absolute must read, it is an enthralling read for those who like their contemporary YA deliberate, and can cherish the unconventional romance. It was an incredible read for me, and I hope it is so for you too.

“How can something so wrong feel so right?”

5 out of 5 stars (uhhmmm…the truth is more than 5 stars)

The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

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I know that this book has been published a mere decade ago and it’s a little rusty for me to even reviewing it; I’m aware of that. (Of course I watched the movie ten years ago but not able to read the book, just because I haven’t got the copy of the book – I enjoyed the movie.. really!).
Okay let’s talk about the book… There is no truly gripping story line in The Devil Wears Prada. Instead there is factory assembly line of characters: the stand-out-in-the-crowd protagonist, who manages to stay true to herself, despite the pressure around her; the sycophantic colleague who belittles and berates her but ends up respecting her; the boyfriend/best friend who just doesn’t understand!; and finally, the evil boss who thwarts her at every turn but ends up taking the protagonist under her wing.
There’s one thing that really stands out in this very form of book; Lauren Weisberger’s writing style. It’s corny but it feels raw, very descriptive, witty and unadorned in sort of sarcastic ways. She provided the readers a harsh but true reality in the fashion world, of how they worship size 0, even given the fact that this book is actually released thirteen years ago. She manages to keep the pace steady, with a little rush and hecticness in terms of Andrea’s restless job of chasing, catching, searching and fetching every unreasonable demands from Miranda. I also love how the author being so spoiled on giving us an insider of every brand names imaginable, as well as a quick tour of New York. Though sometimes her writing feels like having loose edges and dull events, this book still is considered as one hell of page-flipper in sort of bitchy and expensive way. I also love how Lauren Weisberger rises up the tense on the last 3 chapters and the way she handles the end; seems cliché, maybe, but it’s as simple as that.
While I read the book quite quickly, I still found it too long. This material works perfectly for a movie, but in a book, I really don’t want to read about the main character getting coffee every day. That gets old very quickly. Nevertheless, I really liked the storyline in general, and it had some funny bits. While it’s an enjoyable story, you do need to take this with a massive grain of salt, because it deals with very sensitive topics like women starving themselves just to look good in the eyes of the fashion world. If you can handle that, then I see no reason why you should not enjoy this book. It’s just that, when you compare it to the movie, it’s a little underwhelming. The movie was more exciting. I thought the book was a bit slow paced and repetitive so it lacked tension. I wish the plot grew with more suspense instead of just Andrea getting her tasks done for half of the book. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book because of the chick-lit and young adult mix. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys reading about fashion and girly things!

Oh, don’t be silly – EVERYONE wants this. Everyone wants to be *us*.

3 out of 5 stars

Serafina and the Black Cloak by Robert Beatty

Serafina and the Black Cloak is an adorable children’s novel with a fairly straight forward plot. Yes, there are twists and turns along the way, but there isn’t anything overly complex. Even though the novel’s main plotline is simple – and I hate calling it simple because it makes it seem like the book wasn’t good – it was captivating because of its characters.
Robert Beatty created a most mysterious girl with Serafina, who is described as having golden eyes and strangely enough, four toes instead of the normal five. Those differences only add to the air of mystery surrounding her and keep you wondering what it is that makes her so special. She’s a girl with a good heart and a kind soul that you can’t help but admire. Befriending the owner’s of Biltmore’s nephew, Braeden, makes this story even more charming. The two quickly hit it off, despite their obvious differences in social class, and they both team up convinced that they’re going to be able to find these children. Through her friendship, Serafina starts seeing the world through a new set of eyes, only seen before through the pages of books. She sees the good in the world but because of the man in the black cloak, she’s also uncovering the bad as well.
She was beginning to see how difficult it was to determine who was good and who was bad, who she could trust and who she had to watch out for. Every person was a hero in his own mind, fighting for what he thought was right, or just fighting to survive another day, but no one thought they were evil.
Combine Serafina’s mysterious storyline with her character development and you have a winning combination. It allows Robert Beatty to create a story that I would certainly read over and over again.
Serafina possesses a definite horror, but isn’t quite as terrifying as it is charming. The unique heroine is definitely the spotlight of this tale with her most uncommon story of her life and how she came to reside in the Biltmore Estate basement.
I will admit that around the half-way mark, it was fairly obvious to me where the author was going with some of the plot elements. I wouldn’t say the entire book was predictable, but some parts were – for adult readers. I do think younger readers, who are the main target audience, will not find it as easily predictable.
Overall, I will admit I enjoyed reading Serafina and the Black Cloak. It certainly wasn’t overly complicated, yet the captivating characters and eerie plot/atmosphere created by the author made it an enjoyable read. It really shows that not every children’s fantasy book has to have an overly complex plot to be good.
Sometimes in children’s literature, especially the fantasy genre, authors try to overcomplicate books. It seems as if there is this fear that simple doesn’t work or that readers will only read a book if it is overcomplicated, which isn’t true. When done correctly, simplicity works and it is shown in Serafina and the Black Cloak.

“Our character isn’t defined by the battles we win or lose, but by the battles we dare to fight.”

3 stars out of 5

 

Pretending To Be Erica by Michelle Painchaud

I have to write this immediately. I mean, my review for this book, while I still have the Violet-Erica hangover.

Because of Goodreads I met this novel. I read the synopsis in advance because the title caught my attention. I want to know what the novel is all about.
Violet was raised by a criminal to be a con artist. Her mission? To con a wealthy woman whose daughter, Erica, had been kidnapped when she was four years old. Violet was adopted by her “father” when she was young and her whole life has been a prelude to the scam.
The entire story intrigues me, simply because it’s creepy and twisted and I just can’t believe that Violet is a fabulous con artist: very smart… she knows very well what she’s doing and the consequences of getting caught. Things start turning complicated as Violet starts forming attachments with people in Erica’s life.
Michelle Painchaud is a brilliant writer, Pretending to be Erica is her debut novel and when I find out about this in Goodreads, my reaction was “are-you-kidding-me?”Really, I am truly impressed, her writing style hooked me in from the very first page, I found it difficult to break away from her novel, to the point that I don’t want to put my e-reader down, I really wanted to finish it all in one sitting (but,that’s not possible… I have workloads to do and I am a wife). I was amazed with the story that Michelle Painchaud crafts along with the characters that she creates. She includes peripheral characters who add to the tense, climactic ending. Twist and turns aplenty keep the reader turning page after page until the very satisfying ending.
Pretending to be Erica is a young adult thriller. The protagonist is a character with questionable motives and an even more indeterminate past. Touching and with a beautiful turn-around at the end, this book will keep the readers thinking long after they have closed the book.

” The boy doesn’t know who I am. He thinks he does. He’s good to talk to—challenges my brain. Seems like he’s always trying to look inside of me. It’s nice. To have someone try to figure you out. He never will, but the effort is nice. “

5 stars out of 5

The Grownup by Gillian Flynn

64 pages novel, The Grownup. I have read Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, It introduces me that Gillian Flynn is a master of the dark, psychologically twisted character who leads the reader on a delightfully sick reverse of the hero’s quest. The Grownup is no exception. It is a short story by Gillian Flynn published in the form of a book. It is a hybrid between a thriller and a horror story with amusing plot twists. The narrator is a lifelong grifter, having mastered the secrets of successful panhandling before puberty. Her lazy mother never worked legitimately a day in her life, preferring to beg, steal, panhandle, manhandle and manipulate. Even though our nameless main character attended a swanky charter school, she left home at 16 and proceeded to do things that guaranteed she, too, could never hold a respectable job. So, she gives hand jobs to men in the back room of Spiritual Vibes and poses as a psychic up front.  Her business thrives at both ends. She has one special gentleman who visits her often (of course, for the back end service) and lends her books. Thriving businesses add to greed, right? So she agrees to do some cleansing at a haunted Victorian house at the request of a young lady named Susan to rope in a few extra bucks. She dreams big money. Our heroine’s life is perfect. Or is it? Bizarre happenings and Susan’s creepy stepson Miles enter the picture. The story bears resemblance to Gillian Flynn’s writing style of suspense and a manipulative female lead. The story is fast paced and with each page you ask “Who is the Grown up?”. I did not feel the horror said to be embossed in the story, but I was more fascinated by the characters in it. The Grownup was intended to leave the reader salivating – trying to determine who is telling the truth, who is the liar, and what will happen when two totally messed up people arrive at the paranormal convention. There’s sure to be lots of complaining from readers who expected more, and there will be those who will say Gillian Flynn is taking advantage of her fanbase by releasing this as a standalone hardcover. Regardless, each side will be secretly hoping the talented Flynn will flesh this tantalizing tale into a fully fledged novel. “But I wasn’t a well-read  bookworm; I was just a dumb whore in the right library.”  My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

64 pages novel, The Grownup. I have read Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, It introduces me that Gillian Flynn is a master of the dark, psychologically twisted character who leads the reader on a delightfully sick reverse of the hero’s quest. The Grownup is no exception. It is a short story by Gillian Flynn published in the form of a book. It is a hybrid between a thriller and a horror story with amusing plot twists.

The narrator is a lifelong grifter, having mastered the secrets of successful panhandling before puberty. Her lazy mother never worked legitimately a day in her life, preferring to beg, steal, panhandle, manhandle and manipulate. Even though our nameless main character attended a swanky charter school, she left home at 16 and proceeded to do things that guaranteed she, too, could never hold a respectable job. So, she gives hand jobs to men in the back room of Spiritual Vibes and poses as a psychic up front.

Her business thrives at both ends. She has one special gentleman who visits her often (of course, for the back end service) and lends her books. Thriving businesses add to greed, right? So she agrees to do some cleansing at a haunted Victorian house at the request of a young lady named Susan to rope in a few extra bucks. She dreams big money. Our heroine’s life is perfect. Or is it? Bizarre happenings and Susan’s creepy stepson Miles enter the picture.

The story bears resemblance to Gillian Flynn’s writing style of suspense and a manipulative female lead. The story is fast paced and with each page you ask “Who is the Grown up?”. I did not feel the horror said to be embossed in the story, but I was more fascinated by the characters in it. The Grownup was intended to leave the reader salivating – trying to determine who is telling the truth, who is the liar, and what will happen when two totally messed up people arrive at the paranormal convention. There’s sure to be lots of complaining from readers who expected more, and there will be those who will say Gillian Flynn is taking advantage of her fanbase by releasing this as a standalone hardcover. Regardless, each side will be secretly hoping the talented GillianFlynn will flesh this tantalizing tale into a fully fledged novel.

“But I wasn’t a well-read bookworm; I was just a dumb whore in the right library.” 

 4 out of 5 stars

 

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

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Slamming the door shut as my co-workers left, a thrill of excitement overpowered my hitherto dull and a busy day. finally, I had the office to myself. I sat infront of my desktop and start opening my Goodreads account, after a month of not logging in it, here I am browsing for some new books that I want to explore. Finding myself stumbling across this interesting book. Well, it’s interesting because the story is all about an old man, old because he’s 59 years old, and his name is Ove (looks like the word LOVE that lacks in “L” and pronounced ooh-veh), he is a grumpy, firm and practical old man who just wants people to follow the rules and to leave him alone. He is a man of absolutes. Right is right, wrong is wrong, and never the twain shall meet. So when his new neighbours drive up on his lawn, destroy his mailbox, and ruin his garden, he is understandably upset. Day after day his plans are interrupted by neighborhood concerns, no matter how much he tries to get away from it all. And yet, even though he is extremely reluctant to communicate with his neighbors, some of them foreign, some of them the kind of losers who can’t even back up a trailer, some of them insinuate themselves into his life and little by little, he starts to become involved with them.

I find it impressive that Fredrik Backman is able to pull this off; Ove is quite an unlikable man, however you can actually empathize with him and slowly, as you get to know him, you actually come to like him. Frankly, there’s simply something irresistible about this character. Words can’t express it but it’s definitely there, as many of the characters in the book agree with. Speaking of which, many of them are also very likable and epitomes of certain types of people most of us will recognise from our own life. We all know some blond, shallow, cruel lady that owns a Chihuahua and hates cats, nicknamed by Ove; Blond Weed and Mutt respectively or a nice, cheerful but clumsy and kinda foolish next door neighbor who means well but somehow always manages to mess up.

The story is filled with everyday and kind of ordinary events. This doesn’t create a dull story, on the contrary, Fredrik Backman really managed to present these ‘dull’ events in a way that can’t be described any differently than delightful and amusing. He achieves this via Ove’s thoughts and comments coupled with the hilarious dialogues that make up this novel. This demonstrates that everyday life is full of excitement and riveting things as well. Combined with the recognisable minor characters, this creates a lot of familiarity, yielding an easy to relate to novel into which many of us can effortlessly project ourselves.

This novel will make you laugh out loud, bring you on the verge of crying and will stay in your mind. It is filled with conversancy yet those elements are presented in a way that’s highly enjoyable, which prevents them from being dreary. I find this to be the perfect novel to curl up with on the couch on a rainy, grey day as it’s certain to lift your spirits. It’s extremely entertaining and shows how seemingly little things can have a great influence on someone else‘s life. It’s a feel good story, but it also gets you thinking and changes the way you perceive what’s around you. I can endlessly rave on and on about how amazing this novel is, but you simply have to read it and meet Ove yourself. And once Ove is in your heart, life will never be the same.

I salute you Mr. Fredrik Backman, you are one of the best!

“Loving someone is like moving into a house. At first you fall in love with all the new things, amazed every morning that all this belongs to you, as if fearing that someone would suddenly come rushing in through the door to explain that a terrible mistake had been made, you weren’t actually supposed to live in a wonderful place like this. Then over the years the walls become weathered, the wood splinters here and there, and you start to love that house not so much because of all its perfection, but rather its imperfections. You get to know all the nooks and crannies. How to avoid getting the key caught in the lock when it’s cold outside. Which of the floorboards flex slightly when one steps on them or exactly how to open the wardrobe doors without their creaking. These are the little secrets that make it your home.”

5 out of 5 stars

Sundays At Tiffany’s by James Patterson

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I’m thinking..

Maybe when I was a child I have my own imaginary friend but I don’t remember him anymore…

As a little girl, Jane has no one. Her mother Vivienne Margaux, the powerful head of a major New York theater company has no time for her. But she does have one friend, Michael and no one can see him but her. But Michael can’t stay with Jane forever, and on her eighth birthday, her imaginary friend must leave her. When Jane is in her thirties, working for her mother’s company, she is just as alone as she was as a child. Her boyfriend hardly knows she’s there and is more interested in what Vivienne can do for his career. Her mother practically treats her as a slave in the office, despite the great success of Jane’s first play, “Thank Heaven.” Then she finds Michael handsome, and just the same as she remembers him, only now he’s not imaginary. For once in her life, Jane is happy and has someone who loves her back. But not even Michael knows the reason behind why they’ve really been reunited.

Sundays at Tiffany’s my first James Patterson’s novel book, and he never let me down. It’s a fictional story but it made me think that “wow an imaginary friend maybe I have one when I was a child”. This book captures my heart because the book demonstrates what a person is willing to do and how far a person is willing to go for it. In the middle of the story I thought my heart will hurt again just like what God-Shaped Hole did to me, but I was wrong. This book has an amazing twist that I failed to anticipate that will happen. James Patterson did a great job of connecting the readers to every characters and their emotions. This book is a quick page turner – the novel has a different emotions – you will get excited, you will fall in love, you will get mad, and you will find yourself wanting to eat ice cream,you will get sad and be surprised. Absolutely for everyone.

People always remember the worst day of their lives. It becomes a part of them forever.

4 out of 5 stars